Public Speaking Types: The Memorized Speech
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Public Speaking Types: The Memorized Speech

In memorized speaking, you develop greater audience contact because you can look directly into the eyes of your audience as you deliver your speech. You can use your gestures to the best advantage as you become spontaneous in reacting to your own talk.

One of the top fears for most people is public speaking. Speaking in public takes practice in order to be able to deliver a speech in public that is smooth and does not seem canned. You want to be able to speak normally, and with ease so your audience will stay focused on what you are speaking about. Understanding the topic that you are speaking about can really help you deliver a smooth speech and helps the audiences believe what you are talking about. This article will help you get over the nerves of public speaking and how to deliver an effective talk and be a success with your speech or talk.

While it is true that extemporaneous speaking presents the ideal type of speaking for most people, the reciting of the speech from memory is used with success by many speakers. You, too, can be a successful speaker through the use of the memorized manner of speaking.

This kind of speaking will be advantageous to you, beginners in the art of effective communication. In a memorized speech, you develop a sense of confidence to give your speech exactly as you have committed it to memory, without flaw or hitch. Here is where you eliminate stammering or hesitating since your keen memory will serve you to the best advantage.

In memorized speaking, you develop greater audience contact because you can look directly into the eyes of your audience as you deliver your speech. You can use your gestures to the best advantage as you become spontaneous in reacting to your own talk. And, there will be a good deal of animation and directness in speaking from memory.

However, speaking from memory has also its disadvantages: you are likely to forget certain words during the pressure of delivery unless you have thoroughly rehearsed the speech aloud so that the words recur to you automatically. This breaks your train of thought, embarrasses you, cuts your audience contact and diverts the audience's attention from the thought of your speech.

In this type of speaking, you place too much emphasis on memorizing the words rather than on the communication of ideas. Consequently, you become mechanical or robot-like in your delivery. You lose your sense of naturalness and your spontaneity as you do not have the chance to create thoughts before your audience. Furthermore, in a memorized speech, you are not given the chance to adapt your speech to unexpected audience reactions. If a point needs further clarification or if the audience evinces disapproval of a statement, you are unable to depart from your memorized script and you cannot care for the emergency adequately. Hence, you give your audience the impression that your speech is ready-made or "canned." For this reason, you reduce the audience's spontaneous responses to you and you lose their belief in your sincerity.

Lastly, there is much worry connected with this kind of speaking. You are constantly in a state of nervousness as you are never sure that your memory will not fail you at a crucial point. Until the speech is over, you cannot be at rest.

To be able to use effectively the memorized speech, you must combine this type with an extemporaneous way of giving your talk so as to win audience interest and attention.

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Comments (3)

Nicely presented article. Your last comment is right on the mark (re: combining memorization with extemporaneous delivery); I have found much success with this format.

You explain this well with supportive conclusions as well. I have listened and given both and agree with your info.Out of votes so will promote.

I agree with Sharla. Good article.

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