Key Pointers in Recycling Your Speech
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Key Pointers in Recycling Your Speech

Practice using laser pointers or similar tools just prior to using them. Sometimes batteries or bulbs need replacing. The time to do this is before your presentation begins. Don't recycle a presentation for an audience that heard you speak a short time ago. Write new material. Refer to key points, but offer new illustrations to make them stick.
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  1. Practice using laser pointers or similar tools just prior to using them. Sometimes batteries or bulbs need replacing. The time to do this is before your presentation begins.
  2. If it's practical, meet and greet attendees as they enter the room. Introduce yourself and exchange small talk. "This is a lovely facility. I've never been here before. Have you?" Later you may feel more comfortable making eye contact with friendly faces. Take care not to let one individual monopolize your attention. Don't get so involved in conversation that you neglect to start the program on time.
  3. Don't speak for longer than planned. If you're completely in charge of the program, make sure to announce break time so people can use restrooms, make phone calls, etc. Be clear about the time you will start speaking again. If some people are slow to return to the room, use your judgment about waiting for them. Generally, you'll want to stick to the announced time so you can finish the session on time and not omit material.
  4. Familiarize yourself with handouts. If you recycle handouts without reading them, you may not remember details. This can be embarrassing if someone asks questions about something mentioned in the handout.
  5. Artificially heated or cooled meeting rooms tend to have dry air that can make a speaker hem, haw, and cough. See to it that you have a glass of water available before you begin to speak. Step away from the microphone before you take a sip of water.
  6. If you're presenting a longer program, you may be tempted to remove your tie or jacket as the day moves on. Think carefully about whether you should. Make your decision based upon how this might affect your image.
  7. Be mindful of room temperatures, the availability of water, pads, pencils, and anything else that affects the comfort of attendees. It's likely that someone else will be in charge of these matters, but you're affected by how well your audience fares. One of the benefits of returning to a location to give a presentation is that a track record has been established. If the environment left something to be desired in the past, you may want to inquire about conditions before the speaking date. Speak to someone who has the authority to make a difference. Ask for assurances that everything will be handled in a satisfactory manner this time.
  8. Ask for feedback. Will you want to change the survey you used in the past? Take advantage of the opportunity to build on what you learned last time. You might have asked, for instance, "With whom will you use the information you obtained today?" And perhaps you offered multiple choices such as coworkers, clients, and people in business as well as in personal life. On this occasion, you might repeat the same question but change the multiple-choice options. Take the time to consider how you will benefit from information you obtain from a survey - then ask your audience for that feedback.
  9. Did you literally run out of steam at the end of the presentation last time? If so, be ready to go out with a roar now. Or if you were pleased with your finale last time, be ready to repeat it. In short, put thought and energy into the good bye part of your presentation. You'll want to leave attendees with something to think about or act upon. You want the experience to change them in some way. And you may just want to be invited back.

Don't recycle a presentation for an audience that heard you speak a short time ago. Write new material. Refer to key points, but offer new illustrations to make them stick.

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Comments (2)

I really got benefits from your articles

Valuable points made. I think what stands out for me is to begin on time.

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