How to Write a Speech That Will Capture Your Audience
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How to Write a Speech That Will Capture Your Audience

Eliminate some of your fear of public speaking. Write a speech that your audience will remember by following these steps.

Public speaking is said to be one of our major fears. For some, standing before an audience and delivering a speech is a terrifying experience. However, some of that fear can be reduced by adequate planning and preparation. Writing your speech well in advance helps give you confidence.

Public speaking is said to be one of our major fears. For some, standing before an audience and delivering a speech is a terrifying experience. However, some of that fear can be reduced by adequate planning and preparation. Writing your speech well in advance helps give you confidence.

Answer Four Essential Questions

Initially, before you begin writing, there are four questions you need to answer. The first of these is who is your audience? Find out who the audience will consist of and why they will be there listening to you. Whether it’s a small panel considering your suitability for a job or a project, right through to a larger and more public audience, knowing why you are writing the speech helps.

What is the purpose of your speech? Is it to inform, inspire, entertain or persuade? Every speech has a purpose and it’s best to establish this clearly in your mind before starting to write.

What will your message be? Just as in writing an article, you need to establish the reason for your speech. What will your intended message be? Knowing this helps you to stay on track and gather information or ideas that will support your message.

What will your key points be? Just as in writing an article, a speech needs key points or main ideas. List these before you start writing.

Keep it Simple

When writing a speech, remember you will be presenting it to an audience. You need to capture that audience and present your ideas in a way that enables them to remember what you’ve said long after the speech is finished. Too many facts and ideas will confuse the listeners. Keep your key points to only three. Decide what they are and then arrange your material under them accordingly.

Organise Your Ideas

Always keep to a simple speech structure of beginning, middle and end. Your introduction is the place to introduce the ideas you want the audience to consider. Expand on your three key points in the body of the speech. The conclusion brings those ideas together with a final statement.

Remember Your Audience

Earlier I suggested you know your audience. Keep this in mind when planning your content. The audience consists of people. They will be more interested in your speech if they feel your speech has been prepared with them in mind. No matter what your content is, try and include a personal story to support your facts. Listeners are more likely to remember relevant anecdotes than they are facts and statistics. Read your written speech aloud, to ensure it flows easily and fix any parts that don’t. As you read it aloud, consider whether this a speech you’d enjoy listening to.

Capture Your Audience

When writing your speech keep in mind your audience, your purpose and your message and you’ve got the tools for writing a speech that will capture your audience.

Throw in some personal stories to support your facts and your audience will go away happy. Planning for success is an essential step in speech writing.

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Comments (4)

Good Article Val. I majored in public speaking in college and one of the most important things I learned is that speeches should not have introductions they should have attention steps. If you grab your listeners attention from the word go and maintain good eye contact with your audience then the most often remember your speech.

Good advice Val I have done quite a bit of public speaking and have always found just a little spark of humour and you have your audience in you hands, well it works for me anyway lol

I guess it all depends where you learn public speaking, Martha. That beginning stage of an article that I call introduction is another way of introducing those attention steps you speak of. Once we were told to tell them what we are going to say. Glad to meet another fellow public speaker :-)

Hi Johnny, so you're into public speaking too. Is this something that writers do as well, another way of using words. You're right, humour is so important.

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