How to Make an Impact Arrival at Your Presentation Venue
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How to Make an Impact Arrival at Your Presentation Venue

How you arrive at your presentation venue can determine the success of your presentation. Paying attention to making an impact arrival is an important part of presentation preparation.

Whether your presentation is to be given in a familiar room at your workplace or somewhere unfamiliar to you, the impact of your arrival is important to both you and your audience. The minute you arrive at the venue is when others start judging you, so it’s important to make good first impressions. Audience satisfaction is something every speaker or presenter should aim for.

Know Where Your Venue Is

Before the day of the presentation, make sure you know where you’ll be delivering your presentation. Find the building and know where the entrance is. If you’re unable to enter the building head of time, phone and ask the person in charge of your event where to report in on arrival. Check that you know where you’ll be parking your car or where the nearest public transport stop is.

Arrive Early

Make sure you arrive in plenty of time. On arrival identify the person who has arranged your presentation and confirm any last minute details. Whether you’re the only speaker for the event or are one of several, it’s important to know how the evening or meeting is going to proceed.

By arriving early you have time to set up your presentation area the way you want it and check that any equipment you may be using is working. After that you’ll feel well prepared and will have time to relax and meet attendees as they arrive.

Project Confidence

It’s understandable you could be feeling a little nervous, especially if you don’t know the audience to whom you’ll be speaking. It’s important to appear confident and unruffled. As you approach the venue consider your posture. Take a steadying breath, straighten up, stand tall and step briskly. First impressions are important. Projecting an aura of confidence helps audience members believe you’re confident. It also helps convince you that you’re confident and makes your presentation role easier.

Appear Friendly and Approachable

Faced with a sea of unfamiliar faces it’s easy to feel nervous. But the people in the room have come to listen to you. They want you to succeed. So, enter the room with a smile and be prepared to be friendly. If you stand back without making contact with audience members, you’ll be considered aloof.

By mixing and mingling with prior to your presentation, you establish rapport with your audience. You pick up little hints of local protocol and knowledge that could be helpful in your presentation. Audience members will look forward to what you’re about to say.

Your Arrival Contributes to a Successful Presentation

Remember that first impressions count. By paying attention to making an impact arrival at your presentation venue, you set the scene for a successful presentation. Arrive early and appear confident and well prepared. Smile and appear friendly, even if you’re experiencing nerves. All these things will help contribute to a successful presentation and audience satisfaction will be guaranteed.

You may also find the following articles useful:

How Pausing Adds Power to Your Speech Delivery

How to Write a Speech That Will Capture Your Audience

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Comments (3)

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I agree. This is one of the crucial times when first impression counts.

You will get hold of your audience attention if you've made a good impression at the start of the presentation. Thanks for sharing.

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