A Must for the Speaker: The Value of Delivery
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A Must for the Speaker: The Value of Delivery

Though delivery is a valuable tool in shaping the thinking of the audience, there is one important fact about delivery that potential speakers must understand: at the moment of delivering his ideas, a speaker is not aware of all that he expresses because he cannot see and hear himself objectively as others see and hear him.
                    value of speech delivery

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Though delivery is a valuable tool in shaping the thinking of the audience, there is one important fact about delivery that potential speakers must understand: at the moment of delivering his ideas, a speaker is not aware of all that he expresses because he cannot see and hear himself objectively as others see and hear him. Of course, during the moment of speech delivery, a speaker cannot see his face nor can he observe his body and look at his audience at the same time. Even if he were to do so, his attention would be divided and his audience contact will be decreased. Again, during delivery, he cannot hear his voice as others hear it because he hears his voice only through his external ear as the sound is transmitted to his inner ear. On the other hand, he may express subtle shades of thought and emotion, of which he may not be wholly aware, which the audience may receive below their conscious level. While it is true that he may concentrate on his immediate intention, he cannot survey in an instant all the means of accomplishment. He must remember that while his audience is subconsciously reacting to his statements, it is also subconsciously reacting to minute changes in his voice and manner, which influence it in reaching decision and in evaluating the entire speaking procedure.

Therefore, the speaker must bear in mind that delivery is more important than the words themselves for these reasons:

  • First, delivery provides more dependable cues to the speaker's sincerity than do words. The manner in which a speaker answers questions or makes statements may support or belie the word meanings.
  • Second, delivery is also the means by which a speaker reveals his belief in, and attitude toward his subject. If the speaker's belief in his subject is overcast with doubt, it will be reflected in his voice and physical expression. If he is certain of his facts and conclusion and he believes that his subject is worthwhile, he will evince quiet assurance and animation.
  • Third, delivery shows the speaker's attitude toward his audience. His smile which is genuine and the tone of his voice which connotes straightforwardness and geniality will signify his relationship with his audience. Hence, it is through delivery that the audience forms their opinion of the speaker as a person.
  • Fourth, through delivery, the speaker delivers the speed of his thinking, i.e., his pace of creating ideas and evolving conclusions, demonstrates fine points of discrimination between one idea and another and expresses the mental and emotional force of his speech. As his whole body responds to such force, the speaker may elicit audience's action by the manipulation of his pitch and inflectional pattern of delivery wherein he shows the force of his thought and the significance of his ideas through emphasis of important words in a variety of ways by stressing them and raising their pitch while unimportant ideas may be subordinated through a decrease of the volume and the lowering of the pitch. At the same time, his body reacts to the force of his ideas.

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